Camshaft Grinding

Placing an Order

Custom orders are usually taken over the phone. However, we can accept e-mail orders as well. During the phone conversation, we are able to recommend a camshaft profile to suit your specific needs. We have over 9500 different profiles to choose from; profiles for hydraulic, solid, flat tappet, as well as roller camshafts. We are able to grind everything from a 2 hp. Briggs & Stratton to a Top Fuel Dragster.

Pre-grinding Process

The first step is to inspect the camshaft to see if it needs any welding or other repairs. After the repairs are made, it is cleaned in a ceramic media solvent bath. This gentle scrubbing action removes rust, grease, and baked-on oil. The next step in the camshaft grinding process is where the camshaft is verified for straightness and the centers are verified for true. The centers are used to drive the camshaft, along with the dowel pin or keyway. The main bearing area is straightened within one-thousandths of an inch. This verifies that the profile will be in exactly the same location as when in the head or in the block.

Grinding Your Custom Camshaft

The first step is to set up the cam grinding machine for the application that will be performed. This is accomplished by loading the desired profile onto the tracking headstock. Different camshafts have different firing orders. The firing order is set by the “index” plate. Placed on next is the actual grind profile that will be used during regrinding. These “masters” are exact replications of camshafts that we’ve ground previously. This allows us to duplicate the exact profile on the core that has been selected. The profiles are tracked onto the cams, and any custom lobe separations can now be made manually using the headstock. When we bring a lobe center “in” or “tighter,” the “power band” is shortened. Racers use this method to keep their race cars “in the power”. Most computer-controlled cars require wider lobe separation.

Post-grinding Quality Control

This process is performed on every camshaft that we produce. The camshafts are checked for straightness to verify that they didn’t bend during the grinding process. After they are straightened to less than 1/2 thousandths on the main bearing areas, each lobe is checked to ensure they are within tolerances for “run-out”. If it is not within tolerance, it is rejected and returned back to the grinder to be reworked. After every lobe is checked and has passed inspection, the mains are taped with protective wrap in preparation for the Parco surface treatment.

Surface Treatment Process

This is a surface treatment that is done to all of our cast iron camshafts. It is a phosphate coating that inhibits rusting on the lobe areas. This is done in a heated solution of Parco Lubrite-2. The camshafts are hung evenly on a rack. They are then submerged into the 200′ F solution for approximately 30 minutes which will allow appropriate coating. Under a microscope, the surface appears to have “fish scales.” This helps retain pre-lube during the break-in procedure.

Once they are removed from the solution, the cams get rinsed off in a freshwater bath. They are then ready to have the main bearing area protective material removed. This is also where the camshafts are marked for warranty protection. All of the cams are marked to identify them as ours.

Micro Polishing Main Bearing Areas

This is one of the final steps of processing a camshaft. The camshaft is spun in our polishing machine. This spins the camshaft at a high rate of speed. A polishing belt is then used on the bearing areas to remove any discoloration that may have occurred during manufacturing.

Protective Lubrication and Packaging

This is the final process that the camshaft goes through before it is shipped out or placed in the will-call area for pick up. After the camshaft mains are polished the camshaft is placed on the rack to be dipped into a rust-preventing lubricant. The camshaft is identified and boxed, and a part # is stamped on the end of the box. The camshaft is now ready to be shipped or picked up.